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's being done. the navy here, commander fleet forces, initially was looking at sailing all the navy ships out of here, and based on the projections said, okay, let's hunker down here. many of the ships have moved to the safest moorings possible, and we've done the same for our purposes so we can reconstitute immediately after the storm and fall in and figure out where there is trouble and where people need our assistance. >> and admiral, even though you say the notice has been out for at least a week, most mariners would know, and for anyone who wouldn't know that this story was on the way, they perhaps were not paying attention, still do you have a concern there is going to be a certain level of search and rescue you'll have to engage in? >> well, certainly, fredricka. there is always that level of concern. and we get certain types of calls all of the time. sometimes we're able to correlate it to vessels in distress, and sometimes they're not actual vessels in distress. almost all the time we will send somebody to determine what's happening, and if that type of situation occurs closer to
enrollment. now's the time. visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-medicare. ♪ >>> i mentioned the navy, for example, and we have fewer ships than we did in 1916. well governor, we also have fewer horses and bayonets. >> that moment from the foreign policy debate got me thinking. and it led to our question of the week. during which war did the u.s. execute its last horse cavalry charge? was it, a, the civil war? b, the spanish-american war? c, world war i? or d, world war ii? stay tuned, and we'll tell you the correct answer. go to cnn.com/fareed for more of the "gps challenge" and lots of insight and analysis. you can also follow us on twitter and facebook, also remember if you miss a show, go to itunes. you can get the audio podcast for free, or you can buy the video version. itunes.com/fareed. >>> this week's book of the week is "plutocrats," by my guest today, chrystia freeland. this book has very interesting data on inequality, it has great reporting, fun tidbits about the lives of the polutocrats and fun advice on what to do with all this. >>> now for the "the last look." take a l
. time to make nice, right? not so much. >> our navy is smaller now than any time since 1917, that's unacceptable to me. >> governor, we also have fewer horses and bayonets. >> ouch. >> we have these things called aircraft carriers where planes land on them. and we have these ships that go under water, nuclear submarines. but, really, there was some nicety, right, mr. romney? >> the president was right to up the usage of that technology. i congratulate him on taking out osama bin laden. i want to underscore the same point that the president made. i supported his action there. i felt the same as the president did. >> i think romney is leaning obama. >> it did not last long? >> we haven't heard an agenda for the president. >> team obama knows full steam ahead. the president went on a two-day battleground blitz this week or, as he calls it -- >> our 48-hour fly around campaign marathon extravaganza. >> speaking of extravaganza, did you hear about donald trump's big, huge, mega game changing bombshell announcement of president obama? yeah, neither did we. he did come out with this -- >
, police choppers did rooftop rescues. at sea the navy is moving three warships in to the area, capable of serving as off-shore helicopter bases. this is still a fast-moving emergency. [ sirens ] >> proof this afternoon evacuations at another major hospital, bellvue, 700 patients on the move. elsewhere the city it seemed like no one moving. >> i think anyone that tried to drive in new york city realized there are a lot of cars on the road. traffic is very heavy. >> reporter: new york's mayor bloomberg announced bridges in manhattan are open but limiting most incoming cars to three occupants or more. for the subways limited service tomorrow but a lot of work ahead. kennedy is up and running. la guardia still closed. the crane, now they say it is tied down and secure. but elsewhere, no progress. only a clearer view of the loss. here in new york city's breezy point more homes destroyed than first thought. and on the jersey shore, a simple fact comes to thought for the mayor of seaside heights. >> we are taking baby steps. we will sort it out at the end trying to get semblance of what was.
the west coast. they also sent generators and water pumps to help with clean-ups. the navy will be on stand by in case the state government asks for them help. and now, picking up the pieces from sandy. staten island is a 60 square mile portion of new york city and it suffered some of the worst devastation from the storm. 19 of the city's deaths happened on staten island and today, i toured some of the hardest hit areas and spoke with residents just beginning to pick up the piecing of their shattered lives. this is quincy avenue and you still can't get close to house number 845. that's where barbara and her son, christopher, barely survived the storm. >> we stayed 11 hour onss on the roof. we kept yelling help to everyone we see. nobody was coming. nobody. >> their neighborhood, destroyed. the water rose feet in just minutes. they escaped with their lives, but suffered unimaginable loss. >> we were told the next day, looking for my sister, she was found dead in her apartment -- we have to get her from brooklyn and try to bury her. >> at the shelter, we saw about 250 people with no place to
food, water. >> reporter: police shopper does rooftop rescues, and at sea, the navy moving three warships into the new york/new jersey area, capable of serving as offshore helicopter bases this is still a fast-moving emergency. proof this afternoon, evacuations at another major new york hospital, bellevue. 700 patients on the move. elsewhere in the city, though it seemed like no one moving. >> i think anybody that tried to thrive around new york city today realized there are a lot of cars on the road, traffic is very heavy. >> new york mayor's michael bloomberg announced bridges open. tomorrow, subways opened but a lot of work ahead. laguardia still closed. that crane, now they say it's tied down and secure. but elsewhere, no progress. only a clearer view of the loss. here at breezy point, more homes destroyed than first thought. and on the jersey shore, a simple fact comes home to the mayor of seaside heights. >> we're at ground zero. we're taking baby steps right now, and we'll sort it out at the end, right now, it's trying to, you know, just trying to get some kind of semblanc
by floodwaters in hoboken, new jersey. we learned today that the navy is sending three amphibious landing ships to the coast of new york and new jersey in case they're needed. president obama stopped by fema headquarters in washington before heading to new jersey to join governor chris christie to tour the damage caused by sandy. we're going to get to that in a moment. buses and ferries are running and bridges into manhattan are now open. the nation's largest subway system is still water logged. limited subway and rail service begins tomorrow. one sign of normalcy today, the new york stock exchange is open. the opening bell rung by mayor bloomberg. president obama arrived as i said in new jersey in last hour to get a personal look at the devastation that sandy left behind. he's touring the damage zone with one of republican mitt romney's most vocal supporters, new jersey governor chris christie who says this is no time for politics. >> this is so much bigger than an election. this is the livelihood of the people of my state. what they expect me to do to get the job done. when someone asks me an
attacked us on 9/11, and thanks to the brave men and women in uniform, the courage of our navy s.e.a.l.s, al qaeda is on the path to defeat, and osama bin laden is dead. after losing 9 million jobs, under the theory that governor romney is now promoting, our businesses under the ideas we've been working with, have added more than 5 million new jobs over the last two and a half years. manufacturing, highest job growth in manufacturing since the 1990s. the unemployment rate is falling. manufacturing coming back to our shores. our assembly lines are humming again. housing prices are starting to pick up. we've got a lot of work to do, but new hampshire, the country has come too far for us to turn back now. we can't afford to go back to the policies that got us into this mess. we've got to continue with the policies that are getting out of the mess. we've got to move forward and that's why i am running for a second term as president of the united states. >> four more years! four more years! four more years! >> now, i'm going to do it with you. we can do it together. you know, now, unl
10:30 p.m. ceo of mount sinai, dr. kenneth navis got the call. the baby from langone is -- >> it's as bad a challenge as can you get, and when you are dealing with tiny babies like this who are so fragile, it really can be an extraordinary circumstance. >> reporter: we're in front of nyu medical center. that's sort of the important point because just over there is the east river. what we now know is that 7:00 p.m. there was no water inside that hospital. at 7:45 there was ten feet. the power started to go out, and then the generators failed. all of a sudden patients and the doctors found themselves in a worst case scenario. as for the parents of little baby martinez, they found out the hospital and their daughter would be evacuated when they watched mayor michael bloomberg on tv. shortly after they lost power, and they had no idea where their baby would be taken. >> it was -- my family members were calling mow the phone because certainly i lost my apartment. we had no access to the tv, no access to internet, month phone service. it was just our cell. >> reporter: just imagine the
critical infrastructure in the state. for that we've got emergency generators. we've got a navy ship that has some helicopters that can help to move assets around the state as well. so we're going to be working with governor christie's office and local officials to identify what is the critical infrastructure, how can we get what's needed as quickly as possible? just a couple other things we're concerned about, one is as power starts coming back on, we want to make sure that people can also get to work. obviously there are a lot of folks in jersey who work in new york in the city and in other places where transportation may be hobbled. one of the things i mentioned to the governor is the possibility of us using federal assets, military assets as well as taking inventory of assets from around the country that can be brought in so that we can help people get to their work. and governor christie also mentioned the importance of schools. the sooner we can get our kids back into school, back into a routine, that obviously helps the families and helps the kids as well. so we're going to ha
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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)

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